Super foods hold the key to good health and fighting disease

Everyday super foods hold the key to good health and fighting disease

The hidden health benefits lurking in a host of everyday foods have been revealed in a new book edited by high-profile nutritionist Rosemary Stanton.

The book, called Foods that Harm, Foods that Heal and published by Reader’s Digest, details the latest research on everything from tea to tuna, cabbage to carrots.

It suggests salmon, eggs, wholegrain breads and soy products to fight Alzheimer’s disease, yoghurt and peppermint tea to tackle flatulence and ginger to quell motion sickness.

And it lists foods which are most likely to trigger allergies, cause irritable bowel syndrome and affect ulcers.

Dr Stanton said a group of international experts collaborated on the text of the book which could help sort out credible nutritional advice from furphies peddled by quacks.

“Researchers have been looking beyond just vitamins to the other substances in foods like phytochemicals which can have great benefits,” she said.

She said studies had shown repeatedly again that taking supplements such as omega-3 fatty acids in tablet form or eating foods fortified with vitamins and minerals such as calcium were no substitute for eating the real thing.

When you eat fish, you get not just the omega-3s but iron, zinc, and iodine, none of which you get taking a tablet or eating bread fortified by omega-3s,” she said.

“Nutrition is certainly moving towards suggesting more natural foods but the food industry is going towards fortification and additives which research is showing is not necessarily effective.”

Dr Stanton said research into the health benefits was exploding but the information was not necessarily making it to the public and confusion was rife.

She said a change in diet could reduce the risk of disease but it was no substitute for medical intervention.

“By altering the balance of the foods you eat, you can control your weight, increase your energy levels to make exercise easier and prevent many health problems,” Dr Stanton wrote in the preface to the book.

The book was first published in 1997 but Dr Stanton said the latest edition was a complete overhaul with more than half the text being new and encompassing new health trends such as low glycaemic index food and low carbohydrate diets.

-Adam



Everyday super foods hold the key to good health and fighting disease (The West Australian)

The hidden health benefits lurking in a host of everyday foods have been revealed in a new book edited by high-profile nutritionist Rosemary Stanton.

technorati tags:, , , ,