Wrinkle creams reviewed by Consumer Reports. Do they work?

Consumer Reports’ (CR) first test of wrinkle creams finds that on average these products made little difference in the skin’s appearance and there’s no correlation between price and effectiveness.

The luxury-priced skin-care offerings didn’t work any better than the drugstore brands in CR’s independent, unbiased tests.

Further, CR’s tests found no relationship between the types of active ingredients in the products and their overall performance.

Olay Regenerist, which is available in drugstores, was the top performer by a small margin.

One of the less-costly products tested, Olay Regenerist, sells for about $19 apiece for the “enhancing lotion,” “perfecting cream,” and “regenerating serum” combination recommended by the company.

Lancome Paris Renergie, $176, performed nearly as well.

The most-costly product tested, La Prairie Cellular ($335 for an ounce of day cream and 1.7 ounces of night cream), was among the least effective.

The wrinkle creams CR tested ranged in price from $38 to $335.

In addition to advising consumers on product effectiveness, CR’s January report offers tips for preventing wrinkles in the first place and discusses treatments available only by prescription, such as retinoids, and chemical peels available in a doctor’s office.

In CR’s tests, the top-rated products did smooth out some fine lines and wrinkles after 12 weeks.

But even the best performers reduced the average depth of wrinkles by less than 10 percent, a magnitude of change that was barely visible to the naked eye.

With effects so variable and slight, it was hard for women to judge the performance of the products.

CR conducted the project with Consumers Union’s French counterpart, l’Union Federale des Consommateurs-Que Choisir.

Product testers were recruited by a European laboratory specializing in cosmetic evaluation.

CR purchased a sampling of top selling mass-market lines and costlier products sold in retail stores.

Each tester used a product on one side of her face and the lab’s standard moisturizer on the other side for comparison.

Their skin was examined at the beginning of the 12- week test, four weeks into it, and at the end.

A high-tech optical device that can detect changes in wrinkle depth and skin roughness was used for the examination.

In addition, dermatologic technicians examined each woman in person.

Further, sensory panelists examined photos of the subjects to score effectiveness.

Product testers also gave their opinion about the wrinkle cream they used.
The best treatment for wrinkles is prevention. CR suggests wearing
sunscreen, shading the face, avoiding tanning parlors, and quitting
smoking.

More ways to prevent wrinkles

Consumer Reports Tests Wrinkle Creams for First Time; Results find no miracles and no correlation between price and (U.S. Newswire via Yahoo! News)

Consumer Reports’ (CR) first test of wrinkle creams finds that on average these products made little difference in the skin’s appearance and there’s no correlation between price and effectiveness. The luxury-priced skin-care offerings didn’t work any better than the drugstore brands in CR’s independent, unbiased tests. Further, CR’s tests found no relationship between the types of active

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2 thoughts on “Wrinkle creams reviewed by Consumer Reports. Do they work?

  1. Pingback: Beauty Tips » Skin Care - Clear Skin Without Cleansers

  2. Linda

    Hello, my name is Linda and I just felt compelled to leave a reply here. I’ve tried a lot of anti aging products and have spent upwards of $100 per ounce on some products. I recently tried a product from G&B Organics and i must say, out of all the other anti aging creams and serums I have tried this is by far my favorite! It has so many great anti aging ingredients and also some natural organic ingredients as well. It does wonders for my skin and my age! It is also relatively inexpensive at just $60 for 1.7Oz. I would definitely recommend this to anyone. G&B is a new company and is hard to find.

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